July 18, 2017

The Honda Collection Hall preserves its historic products and racing machines in a fully operational state. As part of maintaining the machines, track tests, open to the public, are held periodically. On July 18, 2017, former Honda factory rider Hikaru Miyagi tested machines in front of a crowd of appreciative Honda fans.

  • RC181 (1967)
    Isle of Man TT Dominator and Lap Record Setter


    RC181 (1967)

    Isle of Man TT Dominator and Lap Record Setter

    The RC181 is Honda’s first foray into the premier 500cc class of World Grand Prix racing in 1966. Development began in February the previous year, with the first model achieving 70PS/12,000rpm from a 449.5cc engine. It was never raced, however, as its displacement was well short of 500cc. When the RC181 debuted in 1966, its displacement was 490cc thanks to expanded bore, outputting over 80PS, the best in its class. Mike Hailwood and Jim Redman took the RC181 to 5 victories, giving Honda its first 500cc class constructors’ title. The 2nd generation RC181 was equipped with a 499cc engine, approximately 10cc larger than its predecessor. Hailwood took this machine to a historic victory at the Isle of Man TT race, setting a lap record that would not be broken for years to come.

    Specifications  
    Engine Air-cooled 4-stroke 4-cylinder DOHC 4-valve Cam gear train
    Displacement 499.6cc
    Maximum output over 85PS/12,000rpm
    Weight 151kg
    Other 6-speed, transistor ignition
  • RVF750 (1995)
    The Machine Went with 212 Laps in the Suzuka 8hours


    RVF750 (1995)

    The Machine Went with 212 Laps in the Suzuka 8hours

    This machine was developed for the Suzuka 8hours World Endurance Championship Race. Aaron Slight and Tadayuki Okada rode the RVF750 to victory after 212 laps at the Suzuka 8hours race, while Aaron Slight became the first rider to achieve three successive victories at the race.

    Specifications  
    Engine Liquid-cooled 4-stroke 4-cylinder DOHC 4-valve Cam gear train
    Displacement 749cc
    Maximum output over 160PS
    Weight 167kg
    Other Twin tube frame, Pro-link rear-suspension
  • RVF750 (1997)
    The Machine that Won the 20th Anniversary Suzuka 8hours


    RVF750 (1997)

    The Machine that Won the 20th Anniversary Suzuka 8hours

    Based on the invincible factory RVF750 of the TT-F1 era, the 1997 model RVF750 was further evolved to lay the foundations of the basic Superbike Race machine. At the 20th running of the Suzuka 8hours race, under typhoon-induced torrential rain, Japanese riders Shinichi Ito and Toru Ukawa were victorious, becoming the first Japanese pair to win the race in 15 years.

    Specifications  
    Engine Liquid-cooled 4-stroke 4-cylinder V4 DOHC 4-valve
    Displacement 749cc
    Maximum output over 160PS
    Weight over 167kg
    Other Pro-link rear-suspension
  • NSR250 (1999)
    The Bike that Won 5 out of 16 Grands Prix


    NSR250 (1999)

    The Bike that Won 5 out of 16 Grands Prix

    The NSR250 competed in the 1999 Road Racing World Championship 250cc class. A new engine and chassis dramatically improved the bike’s performance, giving Honda five wins in 16 Grands Prix, including victories for the Japanese rider Toru Ukawa in France and Valencia.

    Specifications  
    Engine Liquid-cooled 2-stroke V2 Case-reed-valve (RCV-Valve)
    Displacement 249cc
    Maximum output over 90PS
    Weight over 96kg
  • NSR500 (1999)
    The Machine that Won the Championship Six Years in Row


    NSR500 (1999)

    The Machine that Won the Championship Six Years in Row

    The NSR500 competed for 19 years, from 1984 to 2002, winning 10 titles. Its engine, frame and control system was constantly updated throughout its lifetime. In the 1999 championship, the NSR500 won both the manufacturers' and the riders' championships, for its 6th consecutive season. Alex Criville’s first riders’ title was won on the NSR500.

    Specifications  
    Engine Liquid-cooled 2-stroke 4-cylinder V4 Case-reed-valve
    Displacement 499cc
    Maximum output over 180PS
    Weight over 131kg
    Other Twin Tube Frame, Pro-link Rear-suspension
  • VTR1000 (2000)
    The New V2 Suzuka 8hours Machine


    VTR1000 (2000)

    The New V2 Suzuka 8hours Machine

    The VTR1000 SPW debuted at the 2000 Suzuka 8hours Endurance Race as the V2 successor to the V4-powered RVF/RC45 that had dominated this race for the past 6 years. Riders Tohru Ukawa and Daijiro Kato battled fiercely to capture Honda’s 4th consecutive 8hours victory, the 3rd time for Ukawa, and a long-sought first for Kato. Based on the European market VTR1000 SP-1, designed to compete in such racing venues as World Superbike, the SPW was further specially tuned to achieve peak performance for the Suzuka 8hours. Swiftly grabbing victory in only its first year, the VTR1000 SPW left no doubt as to the full potential of its slim and compact V-twin engine.

    Specifications  
    Engine Liquid-cooled 4-stroke 2-cylinder V2 DOHC 4-valve
    Displacement 999cc
    Maximum output over 180PS
    Weight over 167kg
    Other Twin Tube Frame, Pro-link Rear-suspension
  • RC211V (2002)
    The New V5 Machine that Won the Premier MotoGP Championship


    RC211V (2002)

    The New V5 Machine that Won the Premier MotoGP Championship

    Honda debuted the 4-stroke V5 machine in the premier MotoGP class of the Road Racing World Championship Series in 2002. Winning 14 out of 16 races, Honda dominated the premier MotoGP championship where 500cc 2-stroke and 990cc 4-stroke machines raced side-by-side. Honda took both manufacturers' and riders' championships two years in a row. Valentino Rossi won the premier MotoGP championship.

    Specifications  
    Engine Liquid-cooled 4-stroke 5-cylinder V5 DOHC 4-valve
    Displacement 990cc
    Maximum output over 200PS
    Weight over 145kg
    Other Unit Pro-link Rear-suspension
  • CBR1000RRW (2004)
    The 8hours Machine that Achieved an Unprecedented Eight Consecutive Wins


    CBR1000RRW (2004)

    The 8hours Machine that Achieved an Unprecedented Eight Consecutive Wins

    During an eventful Suzuka 8hoursrace in 2004 with riders toppling over one after another, the team of Toru Ukawa and Hitoyasu Izutsu consistently displayed stable, outstanding riding to win, giving Honda an unprecedented eight consecutive wins.

    Specifications  
    Engine Liquid-cooled 4-stroke Inline-4 DOHC 4-valve
    Displacement 998cc
    Maximum output over 195PS
    Weight over 165kg
    Other Unit Pro-link Rear-suspension
  • Castrol MUGEN NSX (2000)
    The Machine that Won the Team Championship

    Castrol MUGEN
    NSX (2000)

    The Machine that Won the Team Championship

    In 2000, the Honda's fourth year of the All-Japan GT Championship, four teams entered five NSX racing cars. Castrol MUGEN NSX won four races and the team championship, with Ryo Michigami, Osamu Nakako, Hidetoshi Mitsusada. Ryo Michigami was the series champion.

    Specifications  
    Engine Liquid-cooled 4-st. V-6 DOHC 4-valve
    Displacement 3,500cc
    Maximum output over 480PS
    Weight over 1,100kg
    Other Honda PGM-FI (Programmed Fuel Injection)
  • Lotus Honda 100T (1988)
    The Machine that Made its Mark with Satoru Nakajima on Japan’s Formula One History

    Lotus Honda
    100T (1988)

    The Machine that Made its Mark with Satoru Nakajima on Japan’s Formula One History

    In 1988, the year that ended the turbo era in Formula One racing, the Lotus Honda 100T was released. Electronically-controlled active suspension introduced in the 1987 season’s 99T had not matured enough, and was dropped for the 100T, which was developed as a more conventional machine. The power unit, however, was a class-leading 1.5 liter V-6 turbo engine. The 100T did not dominate the season, but it finished 3rd in the first two rounds, and made its mark in the history of the Japanese Grand Prix by qualifying 6th and finishing 7th at the hands of Japanese driver Satoru Nakajima.

    Specifications  
    Engine Liquid-cooled 4-st. 80°V-6 DOHC 4-valve twin turbo (RA168E)
    Displacement 1,494cc
    Maximum output 685PS/12,300rpm
    Weight 540kg
    Other Honda PGM-FI (Programmed Fuel Injection)
  • Williams Honda FW11 (1986)
    Winner of Honda’s First Formula One Constructors’ Title

    Williams Honda
    FW11 (1986)

    Winner of Honda’s First Formula One Constructors’ Title

    Honda’s first win in its second phase of Formula One racing came in 1984 with Williams Honda. This was followed in 1986 by its first constructors’ title with the Williams Honda FW11. Rule changes introduced this year to restrain a raging horsepower battle reduced total fuel consumption from 220 liters to 195 liters per race. Honda responded with a new 1,500cc twin-turbocharged engine that not only improved fuel economy, it also surprisingly boosted power output to a maximum of 1,050PS. Piloted by Nigel Mansell and Nelson Piquet, the FW11 won a total of 9 out of 16 races, 5 for Mansell and 4 for Piquet, and captured Honda’s first long-sought constructors’ title.

    Specifications  
    Engine Liquid-cooled 4-st. 80°V-6 DOHC 4-valve twin turbo (RA166E)
    Displacement 1,494cc
    Maximum output over 1,050PS
    Weight 540kg
    Other Honda PGM-FI (Programmed Fuel Injection)

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