Photo

Why the Super Cub was Born

The year 2008 marks the 50th anniversary of the introduction of the Super Cub.
There has never been a bike like the Super Cub: for half a century, its basic design has remained largely unchanged, and its sales continue to grow to this day. This little motorcycle that has won loyal fans in more than 160 countries worldwide genuinely embodies Honda’s fundamental principle of creating products that are both useful and fun.


Press Release: Honda Celebrates 50th Anniversary of Super Cub Motorcycle
Press Release: Cumulative Global Production of Cub Series Motorcycles Reaches 60 Million Units


Photo

The Super Cub Continues to Evolve

While the modern Cub still retains features of the original C100 such as a step-through body, 4-stroke engine, and automatic centrifugal clutch, its internal mechanisms have undergone comprehensive reform. The engine is now PGM-FI-equipped, and many other improvements have been achieved in these fifty years, covering type and quality of materials, manufacturing methods and adjustment of specifications to meet local needs around the world. Without constant evolution, the Cub could not possibly have maintained its popularity for so long.


"Quality Products have no International Boundaries"(1956)


Photo

Design and Feature Flexibility

The Super Cub’s original mission was to be useful—both on the job and at play. Rising standards of living have also brought about the emergence of the Sports Cub, with its focus on recreational riding. In 1961, during the Cub’s third year in production, Honda announced a wide range of new models, including the Cub Racing CR110 and the Honda Monkey, which was developed for amusement parks. That year also marked the release of the Hunter Cub in the United States, a model adapted to the sweeping expanses of the local landscape. And in Europe, Honda released models equipped with pedals to comply with local regulations.

Thanks to flexible modification of design and features to meet the needs of each market, the Cub has won the allegiance of customers worldwide.


Photo

Super Cub Welcomed Worldwide

Even now, the Cub Series continues to expand to new markets as new and innovative models and versions of the Cub series continue to emerge. In recent years, Honda has developed sporty new models like the Dream and the Wave in Thailand. These bikes have been a big hit in rapidly developing Asian markets, and Honda is now producing them throughout Asia. Honda is also developing and manufacturing original models suited to the local environments in Vietnam and China. Demand for the Wave is also strong in Latin America, and it is in production throughout the region. Meanwhile, in Brazil, Honda has addressed customer preferences by developing a popular model called Biz that features a built-in compartment for helmet storage. European customers have taken to the Innova, a scooter made in Thailand, and its sales have expanded to Turkey, Northern Europe, former Soviet nations, and Eastern Europe. Riders in Oceana favor the CT110, a trekking bike produced in Japan.

The Cub series has never ceased to evolve as it expands into new markets. As long as it continues to adapt to the needs of its riders, always achieving the key goals of being useful and fun to ride, the Cub series will surely continue to grow.


Photo

Wave S

Photo

REVO

Photo

Wave 125R

Photo

Wave RS

Photo

Biz 125 ES

Photo

Wave100

Photo

Wave α

Photo

Super Dream

Photo

Future Neo FI

Photo

Inova125i

Photo

Wave125i

Photo

Fit-X

Photo

Supra-X 125R

Photo

Wave125X

Photo

Wave Z

Photo

Dream 125

Photo

Dream 125s

Photo

CT110AG


Photo

Super Cub Equipped with compact PGM-FI

In September 2007, the 50cc Super Cub was switched from a carburetor-type fuel supply to Honda’s electronically controlled, programmed fuel injection system (PGM-FI), featuring continuous, computerized electronic combustion control ensuring optimum combustion to achieve both cleaner emissions and improved fuel economy.

Motorcycle fuel injection was originally developed for large-displacement bikes, and until the PGM-FI developed for the Super Cub, were based on smaller versions of automobile systems. PGM-FI for Super Cub was developed to miniaturize the system while keeping the cost low.

From the fuel pump to the throttle valve, Super Cub’s PGM-FI was completely rethought. A new form of pressure regulator was designed with a simpler construction with fewer parts, resulting in micron-level precision that accurately regulates fuel, that when idling, is squirted from the 130 micron holes for just 2/1000 of a second. The diameter of the new compact PGM-FI system’s throttle valve is 18mm, maybe as small as can be made, reducing its CO value to around 1/5th of its carburetor-equipped predecessor. The Super Cub is so efficient that it can still be kick-started, even if the battery goes dead.

Every aspect of Super Cub’s PGM-FI has been injected with Honda’s advanced technologies.

Learn more about PGM-FI


Worldwide Production Bases

1948
Honda Motor Co., Ltd. established
1958
Production begins at the Yamato Plant (later becomes Saitama Factory, Wako Plant)
1959
Hamamatsu Factory expands production
1960
Suzuka Factory established, begins production
1961
Assembly production begins in Taiwan
1963
Production begins in Belgium (Honda Benelux, N.V. established in 1962)
1966
Production begins in Bangladesh
1967
Production begins in Thailand*
1969
Production begins in Malaysia*
1971
Production begins in Indonesia*
1973
Production begins in the Philippines*
1980
Production begins in Mauritius
1981
Production begins in Colombia*
1981
Production begins in Nigeria*
1985
Production begins in India
1988
Production begins in Mexico*
1989
Production begins in Brazil*
1991
Production begins at Kumamoto Factory*
1997
Production begins in Vietnam*
2002
Production begins in China*
2004
Production begins in Laos*
2005
Production begins in Cambodia*
2006
Production begins in Argentina*
2007
Production begins in Peru*

* Current Production Bases


Cumulative Production Worldwide

Photo
1961
1 million units
1967
5 million units
1974
10 million units
1983
15 million units
1992
20 million units
2002
35 million units
2005
50 million units
2008 (April)
60 million units

* Current Production Bases


Super Cub C100, The Original Super Cub

Photo